Topic: For late 40s guy in the tech fields, I know I am approaching the end of the road in Labrador
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. said:
. said: I don't buy the age discrimination thing. I've been on the interviewer side and we considered guys in their 50's and 60's along with everybody else. Most of the time, the old developers would be grossly out of shape, looked tired, and wore out-dated suits to the interview - which although not the main thing we cared about, it did give a bad first impression. But then we'd see they didn't bother to keep up with technology trends, either. They don't have to embrace the new tech, but they should at least know what they are. We did hire a guy who was 64 .. he was athletic, engaging, and new his tech cold. This was a guy with decades of rock-solid experience. The only worry others had about him was that we would disrupt everything because he was so far ahead of other devs, and therefore be too hard to control.

­
Ad guy here again.  I'm late 50's and still keeping very busy.  But I will say there is an age discrimination in my biz, unless you're very good at what you do.

I'll even go as far as to say it's not even a malicious sort of discrimination. Two things come into play: Number one, in my biz, I think you sort of have to be young in order to get really excited about the work. After your 3,000th project, you realize how much of the biz is bullshit; you can do the work, but you don't get emotionally vested in it.  Also, things change. Sitting on a conference call, I hear people in their 20's talk about TicToc or whatever the technology du jour is, and I don't get involved. It's not that I can't learn -- it's that I really couldn't care less, because I've seen 50 other fads come and go.

So, age discrimination is going to be there, whether it's wrong or whether it's a logical extension of the urge to keep things fresh by bringing in new perspectives.  All you can do is prepare: Your own biz, a side gig, or specialize in one area that you have a better grasp of than the majority of your peers.

death is getting closer too. No one is going to ask what is your favorite IDE when you die!


Posted by .
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. said: Hey OP.  I'm in advertising, and it's the same deal.  I didn't start my career until I was about 27, and the first thing I noticed was how few people there were under 45. 

If you're in a career like that, the best thing is to form your own company or go freelance. I've done both, and it's great. If there's anything you can do that is freelance and/or remote, or if there's any type of biz of your own you can start, go for it.

­
A rarity on this board, very helpful advice. Thank you


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Unregistered


T-34.nli said:
Whoa settle down there Chip.  You are supposed to recommend eating a glock.

Lulz


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said: I find industrial automation isn't too bad for older guys.  PLCs and HMI work.

­
This.  Very easy to get into if you've done any business development. You can learn Allen Bradley systems within a few weeks of reading. The coding with these sort of devices isn't rocket-science by any means and yet its very difficult to find these type of engineers.  If you've got any sort of technical savvy you should be able to easily bluff your way thru an interview. Now there is one catch ... the salaries are not great and you're probably looking at a step-down. But so what? its interesting work, you'll be interacting with lot less office politics (although more blue collar types) and you can ride out the final decade of your working career with benefits and something interesting to do.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said: I don't buy the age discrimination thing. I've been on the interviewer side and we considered guys in their 50's and 60's along with everybody else. Most of the time, the old developers would be grossly out of shape, looked tired, and wore out-dated suits to the interview - which although not the main thing we cared about, it did give a bad first impression. But then we'd see they didn't bother to keep up with technology trends, either. They don't have to embrace the new tech, but they should at least know what they are. We did hire a guy who was 64 .. he was athletic, engaging, and new his tech cold. This was a guy with decades of rock-solid experience. The only worry others had about him was that we would disrupt everything because he was so far ahead of other devs, and therefore be too hard to control.

­
Ad guy here again.  I'm late 50's and still keeping very busy.  But I will say there is an age discrimination in my biz, unless you're very good at what you do.

I'll even go as far as to say it's not even a malicious sort of discrimination. Two things come into play: Number one, in my biz, I think you sort of have to be young in order to get really excited about the work. After your 3,000th project, you realize how much of the biz is bullshit; you can do the work, but you don't get emotionally vested in it.  Also, things change. Sitting on a conference call, I hear people in their 20's talk about TicToc or whatever the technology du jour is, and I don't get involved. It's not that I can't learn -- it's that I really couldn't care less, because I've seen 50 other fads come and go.

So, age discrimination is going to be there, whether it's wrong or whether it's a logical extension of the urge to keep things fresh by bringing in new perspectives.  All you can do is prepare: Your own biz, a side gig, or specialize in one area that you have a better grasp of than the majority of your peers.

­
What does it mean you're an "ad guy"?

You sell ads, create ads, place ads? What is this job ...


Posted by .
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There is discrimination in many fields.  I have a science/pharmacology background and wanted to get into pharmaceutical sales.  No chance because I was a male.  If you were female, had an arts degree and big tits, you could name your price.


Posted by .
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1. Go to Dice.com and search FREELANCE jobs with "interviewing immediately", "urgent hire" or "telephone interview" - the tech here is NOT important.
2. Spend one day learning up the basics of whatever product / skillsets they want; don't over-do it though (max 4 hours effort).
3. Search G for skill-set + interview questions and download the lists e.g. "SAP QM Interview Questions" (lots of Indians use these and publish them freely).
4. Apply for the job you found in #1 and ace the interview with the info you got in step $3.
5. You'll get the job 9/10 times and they won't give a fuck about your grey hairs.

I've used this formula myself, and helped MANY people with it get freelance gigs over the years. Why does it work? It would take a whole post for me to explain how the hiring process works and what happens in the final two weeks of a requisition. But just trust me, you can use this to get any job you want any time. Two caveats, this assumes that you're already in IT and have the fundamental skillsets like development, testing, project management, analysis and logic already honed. Additionally it only works for FREELANCE jobs, it will not work for permanent roles.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
­
This.  Very easy to get into if you've done any business development. You can learn Allen Bradley systems within a few weeks of reading. The coding with these sort of devices isn't rocket-science by any means and yet its very difficult to find these type of engineers.  If you've got any sort of technical savvy you should be able to easily bluff your way thru an interview. Now there is one catch ... the salaries are not great and you're probably looking at a step-down. But so what? its interesting work, you'll be interacting with lot less office politics (although more blue collar types) and you can ride out the final decade of your working career with benefits and something interesting to do.

­

Ladder logic isn't interesting its pedantic.­

If you love industrial environments with endless hazards, roughnecks and lifelong substance abusers then its an interesting choice in that its baffling how such environments function at all.­

Also the pay is bad, and you are not exactly recession proof or necessary when everything works :lol:


Posted by .
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Just the other day someone here told me a "tech" superstar isnt the only position for a person with skills in the workforce


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said:
­
This.  Very easy to get into if you've done any business development. You can learn Allen Bradley systems within a few weeks of reading. The coding with these sort of devices isn't rocket-science by any means and yet its very difficult to find these type of engineers.  If you've got any sort of technical savvy you should be able to easily bluff your way thru an interview. Now there is one catch ... the salaries are not great and you're probably looking at a step-down. But so what? its interesting work, you'll be interacting with lot less office politics (although more blue collar types) and you can ride out the final decade of your working career with benefits and something interesting to do.

­

Ladder logic isn't interesting its pedantic.­

If you love industrial environments with endless hazards, roughnecks and lifelong substance abusers then its an interesting choice in that its baffling how such environments function at all.­

Also the pay is bad, and you are not exactly recession proof or necessary when everything works :lol:

­
Yep, plenty of drawbacks for sure. But for an OP who is looking at PLC or putting on the blue vest, I'd take PLC.


Posted by .
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I know a dude still working doing C++ at age 80


Posted by .hosereh
Unregistered


Apply at the Last Chance Garage in Labrador.  They always need help with the projects.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7156016/


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said: 1. Go to Dice.com and search FREELANCE jobs with "interviewing immediately", "urgent hire" or "telephone interview" - the tech here is NOT important.
2. Spend one day learning up the basics of whatever product / skillsets they want; don't over-do it though (max 4 hours effort).
3. Search G for skill-set + interview questions and download the lists e.g. "SAP QM Interview Questions" (lots of Indians use these and publish them freely).
4. Apply for the job you found in #1 and ace the interview with the info you got in step $3.
5. You'll get the job 9/10 times and they won't give a fuck about your grey hairs.

I've used this formula myself, and helped MANY people with it get freelance gigs over the years. Why does it work? It would take a whole post for me to explain how the hiring process works and what happens in the final two weeks of a requisition. But just trust me, you can use this to get any job you want any time. Two caveats, this assumes that you're already in IT and have the fundamental skillsets like development, testing, project management, analysis and logic already honed. Additionally it only works for FREELANCE jobs, it will not work for permanent roles.

­
Those jobs used to mean you live out of a suitcase in some hotel that that some guy here keeps saying he got fucked in by bossman. I think if you have to stay in a place like that more than a few days you are taking it up the ass.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said: 1. Go to Dice.com and search FREELANCE jobs with "interviewing immediately", "urgent hire" or "telephone interview" - the tech here is NOT important.
2. Spend one day learning up the basics of whatever product / skillsets they want; don't over-do it though (max 4 hours effort).
3. Search G for skill-set + interview questions and download the lists e.g. "SAP QM Interview Questions" (lots of Indians use these and publish them freely).
4. Apply for the job you found in #1 and ace the interview with the info you got in step $3.
5. You'll get the job 9/10 times and they won't give a fuck about your grey hairs.

I've used this formula myself, and helped MANY people with it get freelance gigs over the years. Why does it work? It would take a whole post for me to explain how the hiring process works and what happens in the final two weeks of a requisition. But just trust me, you can use this to get any job you want any time. Two caveats, this assumes that you're already in IT and have the fundamental skillsets like development, testing, project management, analysis and logic already honed. Additionally it only works for FREELANCE jobs, it will not work for permanent roles.

­
Those jobs used to mean you live out of a suitcase in some hotel that that some guy here keeps saying he got fucked in by bossman. I think if you have to stay in a place like that more than a few days you are taking it up the ass.

I doubt it now with COVID, and also they realized they can save big bucks by not having someone spend a year in some hotel. 95% of IT work can be done from home. Unless you are dealing with special hardware, even then you could be set up. Maybe the guys who install racks in a datacenter. There you have to be on site.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said: 1. Go to Dice.com and search FREELANCE jobs with "interviewing immediately", "urgent hire" or "telephone interview" - the tech here is NOT important.
2. Spend one day learning up the basics of whatever product / skillsets they want; don't over-do it though (max 4 hours effort).
3. Search G for skill-set + interview questions and download the lists e.g. "SAP QM Interview Questions" (lots of Indians use these and publish them freely).
4. Apply for the job you found in #1 and ace the interview with the info you got in step $3.
5. You'll get the job 9/10 times and they won't give a fuck about your grey hairs.

I've used this formula myself, and helped MANY people with it get freelance gigs over the years. Why does it work? It would take a whole post for me to explain how the hiring process works and what happens in the final two weeks of a requisition. But just trust me, you can use this to get any job you want any time. Two caveats, this assumes that you're already in IT and have the fundamental skillsets like development, testing, project management, analysis and logic already honed. Additionally it only works for FREELANCE jobs, it will not work for permanent roles.

­
Those jobs used to mean you live out of a suitcase in some hotel that that some guy here keeps saying he got fucked in by bossman. I think if you have to stay in a place like that more than a few days you are taking it up the ass.

­
Hawthorne Suites, Bloomington IL.

Dirty things happened to me there when I worked as a cabling road warrior.

Disgusting things involving penis, anal and mouth that I dare not recount.

:scared:


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said: 'Tech' is weird like this.

How many other employment fields have the complexity, constant learning/re-training, constant changes and initial education requirements but uniformly disposes of anyone once they are experienced? :lol:

The automotive industry is that way.  Hardly ever see an older mechanic.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said:
. said: 1. Go to Dice.com and search FREELANCE jobs with "interviewing immediately", "urgent hire" or "telephone interview" - the tech here is NOT important.
2. Spend one day learning up the basics of whatever product / skillsets they want; don't over-do it though (max 4 hours effort).
3. Search G for skill-set + interview questions and download the lists e.g. "SAP QM Interview Questions" (lots of Indians use these and publish them freely).
4. Apply for the job you found in #1 and ace the interview with the info you got in step $3.
5. You'll get the job 9/10 times and they won't give a fuck about your grey hairs.

I've used this formula myself, and helped MANY people with it get freelance gigs over the years. Why does it work? It would take a whole post for me to explain how the hiring process works and what happens in the final two weeks of a requisition. But just trust me, you can use this to get any job you want any time. Two caveats, this assumes that you're already in IT and have the fundamental skillsets like development, testing, project management, analysis and logic already honed. Additionally it only works for FREELANCE jobs, it will not work for permanent roles.

­
Those jobs used to mean you live out of a suitcase in some hotel that that some guy here keeps saying he got fucked in by bossman. I think if you have to stay in a place like that more than a few days you are taking it up the ass.

­
Hawthorne Suites, Bloomington IL.

Dirty things happened to me there when I worked as a cabling road warrior.

Disgusting things involving penis, anal and mouth that I dare not recount.

:scared:

­
Tell me moar.
\
:gayness:


Posted by .
Unregistered


I'm 56. I got laid off about 3 years ago. I had all the same worries about ageism. Fortunately, I had outplacement support as part of the layoff. They looked at my experience and helped me properly format a resume. I took a 3 month contract. The pay was much higher than I had before. But, they didn't need me past the contract term, so I found another job. I've been there a few years and liking it.

If you don't have skills your fucked. If you do play those up. Be honest about what you know and what you don't. Some places are good if your a partial fit and willing to learn the rest. Be flexible. That's what will knock you out of consideration, not your age.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said: I'm 56. I got laid off about 3 years ago. I had all the same worries about ageism. Fortunately, I had outplacement support as part of the layoff. They looked at my experience and helped me properly format a resume. I took a 3 month contract. The pay was much higher than I had before. But, they didn't need me past the contract term, so I found another job. I've been there a few years and liking it.

If you don't have skills your fucked. If you do play those up. Be honest about what you know and what you don't. Some places are good if your a partial fit and willing to learn the rest. Be flexible. That's what will knock you out of consideration, not your age.

­
:lol:

I’m you but nearly 15 years back.

The hair is a lot greyer and the travel sucks (when it was there).

But my mortgage got paid off and I didn’t have a week without work in the last decade.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said: 'Tech' is weird like this.

How many other employment fields have the complexity, constant learning/re-training, constant changes and initial education requirements but uniformly disposes of anyone once they are experienced? :lol:

The automotive industry is that way.  Hardly ever see an older mechanic.

­

For one thing, its absolute murder on the body.


Posted by .
Unregistered


death2me said: Suicide is likely the most sensible option--permanent and effective. Resolves other issues too.

­Practice what you preach, asswipe!
Otherwise, like your leftist views, you’re full of shit!


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
I doubt it now with COVID, and also they realized they can save big bucks by not having someone spend a year in some hotel. 95% of IT work can be done from home. Unless you are dealing with special hardware, even then you could be set up. Maybe the guys who install racks in a datacenter. There you have to be on site.

­Which is why salaries go down. No incentive to pay you to come in.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said:
. said:
­
This.  Very easy to get into if you've done any business development. You can learn Allen Bradley systems within a few weeks of reading. The coding with these sort of devices isn't rocket-science by any means and yet its very difficult to find these type of engineers.  If you've got any sort of technical savvy you should be able to easily bluff your way thru an interview. Now there is one catch ... the salaries are not great and you're probably looking at a step-down. But so what? its interesting work, you'll be interacting with lot less office politics (although more blue collar types) and you can ride out the final decade of your working career with benefits and something interesting to do.

­

Ladder logic isn't interesting its pedantic.­

If you love industrial environments with endless hazards, roughnecks and lifelong substance abusers then its an interesting choice in that its baffling how such environments function at all.­

Also the pay is bad, and you are not exactly recession proof or necessary when everything works :lol:

­
Yep, plenty of drawbacks for sure. But for an OP who is looking at PLC or putting on the blue vest, I'd take PLC.


In Australia independent control systems guys are making $100/hr or more on mining control systems jobs.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said: I know a dude still working doing C++ at age 80

Ungh.


Posted by .
Unregistered


. said:
. said: I know a dude still working doing C++ at age 80

Ungh.
\
:trev:



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