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  In radio, "hitting the post" is when the announcer talks through the intro of a song and ends right as the lyrics begin
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one_who_knows1 said:
WarCrimes said:
one_who_knows1 said:Forgot to say....we all lived in fear of Angelo Ditty.

I never had a problem with him, since my station was always up to snuff technically and with paperwork. But, shitty stations were not in compliance.

I worked briefly for KNBA in Vallejo....a daytimer owned by a moron. The station had equipment from the 1930s and nothing was in compliance with FCC regulations.

But, they did have a studio with an RCA 44BX microphone and a grand piano!!

It was a great place to wash my car and collect a paycheck.



Sounds like a really small industry/community. How many people were in radio at the time? Is it all just mega-corps today?



It was a small community then....but....each station hired far more employees than they do today. For example, I managed a commercial FM station in 1966- 1970. It was a small station, but we still had 16 full time employees. This includes the talent, the managers, and sales.

Nowdays, it would be easy to run a small station with two or three employees maximum. All the programming comes off the satellite now (we had to have DJs 24 hours/day). And, you don't have to do shit for the community now. In those days, you had to do local news, events, and public service to maintain your license.

Big corporations did own radio stations then, but they were limited to 7 total in the USA. For example, KFOG was owend by Kaiser Steel.....a good employer....but the only owned one or two other stations in the country.




"You're FULL OF SJHITER!"
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:emma:
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

. said:"You're FULL OF SJHITER!"
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:emma:



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C.E.
Unregistered

Angelo Ditty was my first encounter with an FCC Inspector. That was 1962 and I was a dj. He was firm, fair, and issued a technical citation. Two years later and two-hundred miles away at another station, there he was again and this time I was the Chief Engineer. He was like the drill sergeant in "An Officer and a Gentleman," and wow did he whip me into shape by offering firm instruction and guidance. I'm still in awe and am eternally grateful, now nearly fifty years later and still in radio.

BTW... "One Who Knows1" is right-on.
WarCrimes
Criminal

535 posts

C.E. said:Angelo Ditty was my first encounter with an FCC Inspector. That was 1962 and I was a dj. He was firm, fair, and issued a technical citation. Two years later and two-hundred miles away at another station, there he was again and this time I was the Chief Engineer. He was like the drill sergeant in "An Officer and a Gentleman," and wow did he whip me into shape by offering firm instruction and guidance. I'm still in awe and am eternally grateful, now nearly fifty years later and still in radio.

BTW... "One Who Knows1" is right-on.



This guy sounds cool. They don't make people like that anymore!
C.E.
Unregistered

Angelo Ditty = unique!

An FCC Inspection of a broadcast station can be "white glove" without notice, and stations could expect one within each license period (which was 3 years, but now 7 years); however, the FCC has been stripped of funding to the extent that there aren't many inspectors now, thus not as many inspections and likely not of the calibre of Angelo Ditty. I know of one 35-year-old broadcast station that has never been inspected in its existence...not even before it signed-on.
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C.E. said:Angelo Ditty was my first encounter with an FCC Inspector. That was 1962 and I was a dj. He was firm, fair, and issued a technical citation. Two years later and two-hundred miles away at another station, there he was again and this time I was the Chief Engineer. He was like the drill sergeant in "An Officer and a Gentleman," and wow did he whip me into shape by offering firm instruction and guidance. I'm still in awe and am eternally grateful, now nearly fifty years later and still in radio.

BTW... "One Who Knows1" is right-on.



Thanks. What station did you work for? Still have your old first phone license? Mine is somewhere in the garage. :laugh:
Original_Lonely_Guy
Moderator

3002 posts

one_who_knows1 said:
Worked for lots of stations including KFOG (san francisco)



:rolleyes:
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

Oops. Forgot to log in.
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Has anyone checked to see if Angelo Ditty is still alive???
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Quick Goog indicates an ANGELO DITTY JR works for the FCC
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

. said:Has anyone checked to see if Angelo Ditty is still alive???



I think he died many years ago.
C.E.
Unregistered

I met Angelo Ditty when I was at KPER 1290, Gilroy, CA in 1962,(now KAZA).
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So a guy named Angelo DITTY inspected radio stations? You can't make this shit up.
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

Original_Lonely_Guy said:
one_who_knows1 said:
Worked for lots of stations including KFOG (san francisco)



:rolleyes:



"This is KFOG. Kaiser Broadcasting. 104.5 San Francisco"

<foghorn sound>

The foghorn sound effect was played on a rack mounted 300 series Ampex 2 channel stereo reel-to-reel recorder. The machine was dedicated to that task only. Typical Kaiser broadcasting using the best equipment available .... no cart machines for that important fog horn! :laugh:

The studio was upstairs at Ghiradelli Center, which became a bit seedy and spooky late at night after the tourists departed.

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Unregistered

:thumbup:

Threads like this are why I keep coming back here.
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Unregistered

Did you broadcast in stereo? Isn't stereo FM a fairly "new" thing?

Also, what kinds of processing did you use on the station's audio? The stuff today sounds likes crap.
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one_who_knows1 said:Thanks. It comes from being fucking OLD!

I worked in radio for 5 years in the late 60s and early 70s. Worked for lots of stations including KFOG (san francisco) and KROY (sacramento).

Axe me anything.

Do you have a face for radio?
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one_who_knows1 said:Very little of radio is local and live now. Most comes from Texas via satellite.

Radio sucks now.

How do you feel about Clinton signing the communications act? Do you think that was the single death nail hammered in by the jews?
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Original_Lonely_Guy said:
one_who_knows1 said:
Worked for lots of stations including KFOG (san francisco)



:rolleyes:

They should change their call letters to KFAG. :lol:
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

. said:Did you broadcast in stereo? Isn't stereo FM a fairly "new" thing?

Also, what kinds of processing did you use on the station's audio? The stuff today sounds likes crap.



Yes, we broadcast in stereo using a tube type multiplex equipment and a tube type exciter.

The only audio processing we used was an Audimax and an Volumax, which were set to keep the modulation above 80% but not over 100%. Both these were "solid state" (IE transistorized).

Because the source signal was mostly records in those days, I suspect that today's totally digital sound is superior.

I think that multiplex stereo was born about 1961 or so. Before that, there was AM - FM stereo. The left audio signal was broadcast on FM and the right on the AM sister station. Because string instruments are typically on the left of the orchestra, FM was used for that side because of its superior treble freqency response.
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necrofags
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one_who_knows1 said:Because a radio station wanted to play as many tunes as possible during an hour. The de-facto standard was 2:00 maximum, so that you could get 9 or 10 records played in 1/2 hour and leave the rest for commercials, news, promos,
If you had a a record which ran long, it would seem to slow down the pace of the show and piss off listeners who did not like the cut.
Some stations ran their turntables + 2% fast to speed up the music and make it seem for hyper and to clear the way for more ads.

I bet Don McLean really fucked up those schedules
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WarCrimes
Criminal

535 posts

These old-tard threads are better than most shit on this board. It's like going back in a time machine. :lol:
one_who_knows1
Older and fucking WISER

5306 posts

. said:
one_who_knows1 said:Because a radio station wanted to play as many tunes as possible during an hour. The de-facto standard was 2:00 maximum, so that you could get 9 or 10 records played in 1/2 hour and leave the rest for commercials, news, promos,
If you had a a record which ran long, it would seem to slow down the pace of the show and piss off listeners who did not like the cut.
Some stations ran their turntables + 2% fast to speed up the music and make it seem for hyper and to clear the way for more ads.

I bet Don McLean really fucked up those schedules



The Beatles broke the mold of sub-2 minute cuts. They, of course, could get their stuff played no matter how long it ran. :laugh:

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